100 Engaging Team Building Games

A clear blue dice.

Table of Contents

  • Introduction

    • Overview of Team Building Games

  • Icebreaker Games

    • Two Truths and a Lie
    • Penny for Your Thoughts
    • Mood Pictures
    • One Word Exercise
    • Back-to-Back Drawing
    • Birthday Line Up
    • Charades
    • Swift Swap
    • Code of Conduct
    • Common Thread

  • Remote or Virtual Team Building Games

    • Show and Tell
    • Photo Caption Contest
    • Morning Coffee
    • Lunch and Learn
    • Online Group Game (Jackbox)
    • Virtual Trivia Games
    • Quarterly Challenge
    • Personality Test Sharing
    • Virtual Escape Room
    • Remote Pictionary

  • Problem Solving Games

    • Your First Idea
    • Back of the Napkin
    • Create Your Own
    • Spectrum Mapping
    • What Would “X” Do?
    • Team Pursuit
    • Code Break
    • Escape Room
    • Puzzle Challenge
    • Marshmallow Challenge

  • Indoor Team Building Games

    • Perfect Square
    • Memory Wall
    • Turn Back Time
    • Paper Plane
    • Build a Tower
    • Flip It Over
    • Sneak a Peek
    • Pyramids
    • Team Flag
    • Salt and Pepper
    • Sell It
    • Barter Puzzle
    • Office Bingo
    • Human Knot
    • Blind Drawing
    • Team Scavenger Hunt
    • Tower of Hanoi
    • Group Juggle
    • All Aboard
    • Trust Fall

  • Outdoor Team Building Games

    • The Minefield
    • Earth-ball
    • Scavenger Hunt
    • Egg Drop
    • Team Outing
    • Volunteer as a Team
    • Tug of War
    • Obstacle Course
    • Field Day Games
    • Relay Races
    • Capture the Flag
    • Geocaching Adventure
    • Nature Hike
    • Sports Day
    • Kayaking or Canoeing
    • Adventure Park Challenge
    • Outdoor Cooking Challenge
    • Paintball
    • Picnic Games
    • Frisbee Golf

  • Communication Games

    • Blindfold Maze
    • Lost at Sea
    • The Listening Game
    • Follow the Instructions
    • Mirror Image
    • The Great Egg Drop
    • Storytelling Round
    • Taboo
    • Telephone
    • Speed Networking

  • Creative Games

    • Collaborative Drawing
    • Build a Story
    • Costume Contest
    • Lip Sync Battle
    • DIY Craft Challenge
    • Creative Pitch
    • Themed Photo Shoot
    • DIY Movie Trailer
    • Ad Campaign Challenge
    • Team Songwriting

  • Trust-Building Games

    • Trust Walk
    • Blindfolded Trust
    • Helium Stick
    • Willow in the Wind
    • Human Spring
    • Mine Field
    • Blindfold Tent Build
    • Trust Circle
    • Group Sit
    • Blindfolded Taste Test

‘Pro-Tip’

Tailor Activities to Your Team’s Interests: Ensure the team-building games you choose align with your team’s interests and preferences. This increases engagement and enjoyment, leading to more effective outcomes.

Introduction

Effective team building is not just about having fun; it’s about creating a cohesive, collaborative, and motivated workforce. Whether you are managing a remote team, a small startup, or a large corporate group, team-building exercises can enhance communication, trust, and overall productivity.

Icebreaker Games

Icebreaker games are essential for warming up the atmosphere and helping team members get to know each other better. These activities are perfect for new teams and can also help long-established teams build stronger bonds. Here are four excellent icebreaker games:

Two Truths and a Lie

Team Size: 3+ people
Time: 2–3 minutes per person
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Each participant takes turns sharing three statements about themselves: two truths and one lie.
  • The rest of the group listens carefully and tries to guess which statement is the lie.
  • After everyone has had a turn, the person reveals which statement was false.

Why It’s Great:

  • This game is an excellent way to learn interesting and fun facts about your colleagues.
  • It encourages listening skills and quick thinking.
  • It creates a relaxed and playful environment, making it easier for team members to open up and engage with one another.

Example:

  • Truth: “I have climbed Mount Everest.”
  • Truth: “I speak three languages fluently.”
  • Lie: “I have never been on an airplane.”

Penny for Your Thoughts

Team Size: 5+ people
Time: 2–3 minutes per person
Materials Needed: A box of pennies or other coins with years corresponding to the ages of your team members

How to Play:

  • Place a box of coins in the center of the room.
  • Each team member draws a coin from the box and looks at the year on it.
  • The person then shares a memory, story, or significant event that happened to them in that year.
  • If someone gets a coin from a year before they were born, they can either choose another coin or share a story about something they know that happened that year.

Why It’s Great:

  • This activity provides a structured way for team members to share personal stories and connect on a deeper level.
  • It encourages reflection and storytelling.
  • It helps build a timeline of shared experiences and highlights the diversity of backgrounds within the team.

Example:

  • “In 2010, I graduated from college and took a backpacking trip through Europe.”

Mood Pictures

Team Size: 5+ people
Time: 2–3 minutes per person
Materials Needed: A collection of diverse images (e.g., landscapes, cities, people, shapes, animals)

How to Play:

  • Spread out a variety of images on a table.
  • Ask each team member to choose an image that resonates with their current mood or feelings.
  • Each person then shares their chosen image with the group and explains why they selected it and how it represents their current state of mind.

Why It’s Great:

  • This exercise allows team members to express their feelings creatively and visually.
  • It helps to gauge the emotional state of the team in a non-intrusive way.
  • It encourages empathy and understanding among team members.

Example:

  • “I chose this picture of a calm beach because it reflects how peaceful and relaxed I feel today.”

One Word Exercise

Team Size: 3+ people
Time: 5–10 minutes
Materials Needed: Post-it notes, pens, whiteboard

How to Play:

  • Choose a phrase or topic related to your meeting or project.
  • Ask each team member to write down one word that comes to mind when they think about that phrase or topic on a post-it note.
  • Collect all the post-it notes and place them on a whiteboard or flip chart.
  • Discuss the words as a group, exploring why each person chose their word and what it represents.

Why It’s Great:

  • This activity is a quick and simple way to collect everyone’s initial thoughts and feelings about a topic.
  • It helps to identify common themes and concerns within the team.
  • It can serve as an icebreaker and a conversation starter for deeper discussions.

Example:

  • Topic: Annual Company Retreat
  • Words: “Excitement,” “Planning,” “Networking,” “Relaxation,” “Innovation”

Back-to-Back Drawing

Team Size: 4+ people
Time: 5–10 minutes
Materials Needed: Pen, paper, pre-drawn images or shapes

How to Play:

  • Split the team into pairs and have them sit back-to-back.
  • Give one person in each pair a picture of a simple object or shape and the other person a blank piece of paper and a pen.
  • The person with the picture describes the object or shape to their partner without saying what it is, using only descriptive language about lines, shapes, and proportions.
  • The partner draws based on the description provided.
  • Once completed, compare the drawings to the original pictures.

Why It’s Great:

  • This game enhances communication and listening skills.
  • It highlights the importance of clear instructions and active listening.
  • It’s a fun way to break down barriers and encourage teamwork.

Example:

  • A picture of a simple house with a chimney and a tree next to it.

Birthday Line Up

Team Size: 8+ people
Time: 10–15 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Ask the team to form a line in order of their birthdays (month and day) without speaking.
  • Team members can use gestures, sign language, or any other non-verbal communication to determine their place in the line.
  • Once everyone is in line, they reveal their birthdays to see if the order is correct.

Why It’s Great:

  • This activity encourages non-verbal communication and collaboration.
  • It’s a fun and challenging way to get everyone moving and interacting.
  • It can lead to interesting conversations about birthdays and personal stories.

Example:

  • People gesturing numbers with their fingers or using hand signals to indicate months and dates.

Charades

Team Size: 8–10 people
Time: 10–25 minutes
Materials Needed: Pre-written cards with actions, movies, books, or phrases

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into two groups.
  • One person from the first group picks a card and acts out the word or phrase without speaking, while their team tries to guess it within a set time limit.
  • If the team guesses correctly, they get a point.
  • Then, it’s the other team’s turn.
  • Continue until everyone has had a chance to act or until time runs out.

Why It’s Great:

  • Charades is a classic game that promotes creativity and quick thinking.
  • It encourages team members to work together and think on their feet.
  • It’s a great way to inject energy and laughter into the group.

Example:

  • Acting out “riding a bicycle” or “baking a cake.”

Swift Swap

Team Size: 10–20 people
Time: 10–15 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Split the team into two groups and have them face each other in two lines.
  • Group A gets 15–30 seconds to observe Group B, trying to memorize as much as possible about them.
  • Group A then turns around while Group B makes several quick changes to their appearance (e.g., switching places, changing hats, swapping watches).
  • Group A turns back around and has 5–10 minutes to identify all the changes.

Why It’s Great:

  • This game enhances observation and memory skills.
  • It fosters a playful competitive spirit.
  • It’s a quick and engaging way to energize the group.

Example:

  • A person in Group B might swap their glasses with someone else or untie their shoelaces.

Code of Conduct

Team Size: 5+ people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Whiteboard or flip chart, markers, sticky notes

How to Play:

  • Write two categories on a whiteboard: “Meaningful” and “Enjoyable.”
  • Ask the group to brainstorm and write down on sticky notes what they believe is necessary for a project or meeting to be meaningful and enjoyable.
  • Place the sticky notes under the respective categories on the whiteboard.
  • Discuss and agree upon the most important values, and create a shared code of conduct based on these values.

Why It’s Great:

  • This activity aligns the team’s expectations and establishes mutual respect.
  • It sets a positive tone for future projects or meetings.
  • It promotes collaboration and inclusivity.

Example:

  • Sticky notes might include “open communication,” “regular breaks,” and “honesty.”

Common Thread

Team Size: 10+ people
Time: 30 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into groups of three to five people.
  • Each group has to find things that everyone in their group has in common. These commonalities can be hobbies, interests, or experiences.
  • After discussing, each group shares their common threads with the entire team.

Why It’s Great:

  • This game helps team members discover shared interests and build connections.
  • It encourages deeper conversations and fosters a sense of unity.
  • It can be a fun way to reveal surprising commonalities within the team.

Example:

  • A group might find they all enjoy hiking, have visited the same country, or share a love for a particular TV show.

‘Pro-Tip’

Set Clear Objectives: Define the goals of your team-building activities. Whether it’s improving communication, fostering creativity, or building trust, clear objectives help measure the success of the activities.

Remote or Virtual Team Building Games

In today’s remote working environment, virtual team-building games are essential for maintaining team cohesion and morale. Here are four excellent remote or virtual team-building games:

Show and Tell

Team Size: 3+ people
Time: 2–3 minutes per person
Materials Needed: Personal items

How to Play:

  • Each team member brings an item to the virtual meeting that they are proud of or that brings them joy.
  • One by one, team members share their item with the group, explaining why it is significant to them.
  • The group can ask questions and engage in conversation about each item.

Why It’s Great:

  • This activity allows team members to share personal stories and connect on a deeper level.
  • It encourages engagement and active listening.
  • It provides a platform for team members to learn more about each other’s lives outside of work.

Example:

  • Someone might share a family heirloom, a favorite book, or a hobby project they’re working on.

Photo Caption Contest

Team Size: 5+ people
Time: 10–15 minutes
Materials Needed: Collection of funny or interesting photos

How to Play:

  • Collect a series of funny or interesting photos and share them with the team before the meeting.
  • Each team member submits their best caption for each photo.
  • During the meeting, present the photos along with the submitted captions.
  • The group can vote on the best captions, and a winner can be chosen for each photo.

Why It’s Great:

  • This game sparks creativity and humor.
  • It provides a lighthearted way to engage with colleagues.
  • It’s a fun break from regular work discussions and encourages out-of-the-box thinking.

Example:

  • A photo of a cat sitting at a desk could have captions like “Working hard or hardly working?” or “Just another day in the office.”

Morning Coffee

Team Size: 3+ people
Time: 15–30 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Schedule regular virtual coffee calls for small groups within your team.
  • These calls are informal and are meant for casual conversation, much like a coffee break in the office.
  • You can either have everyone join a single call or pair up team members randomly for one-on-one chats.

Why It’s Great:

  • This activity mimics the informal interactions that happen in an office setting.
  • It helps team members get to know each other in a relaxed environment.
  • It builds a sense of community and reduces feelings of isolation in remote work.

Example:

  • Team members might discuss weekend plans, hobbies, or any non-work-related topics.

Lunch and Learn

Team Size: 5+ people
Time: 30 minutes
Materials Needed: Presentation materials, lunch

How to Play:

  • Schedule a regular “Lunch and Learn” session where one team member presents a topic to the rest of the team during their lunch break.
  • The topic can be work-related, such as a new tool or technique, or something personal, like a hobby or a recent trip.
  • Team members can ask questions and engage in discussion after the presentation.

Why It’s Great:

  • This activity combines learning with casual interaction.
  • It allows team members to share their expertise and interests.
  • It fosters a culture of continuous learning and curiosity.

Example:

  • A team member might give a presentation on a recent book they read or share tips on productivity tools they use.

Online Group Game (Jackbox)

Team Size: 3+ people
Time: 30–60 minutes
Materials Needed: Jackbox Games, video conferencing software

How to Play:

  • Purchase and set up a Jackbox Games party pack, which includes various fun and interactive games.
  • Share your screen through a video conferencing platform and invite team members to join via their smartphones or computers.
  • Choose a game from the pack, such as “Fibbage,” “Quiplash,” or “Trivia Murder Party,” and follow the on-screen instructions to play.

Why It’s Great:

  • Jackbox Games are designed to be fun and engaging for all participants.
  • The variety of games ensures there’s something for everyone.
  • It encourages creativity, quick thinking, and laughter.

Example:

  • Playing “Quiplash,” where team members compete to come up with the funniest answers to prompts.

Virtual Trivia Games

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 30–90 minutes
Materials Needed: Trivia questions, video conferencing software

How to Play:

  • Prepare a set of trivia questions covering various topics like pop culture, history, science, and company-related facts.
  • Divide the team into smaller groups or have individuals compete.
  • Use a video conferencing platform to host the trivia game, asking questions and allowing participants to answer within a set time.
  • Keep score and announce the winners at the end.

Why It’s Great:

  • Trivia games are fun, competitive, and educational.
  • They can be tailored to the interests of the team.
  • It’s a great way to foster team spirit and friendly competition.

Example:

  • Hosting a trivia night with categories like “Office Trivia,” “80s Movies,” and “World Geography.”

Quarterly Challenge

Team Size: 3+ people
Time: One month
Materials Needed: Depends on the challenge, video conferencing software

How to Play:

  • Design a quarterly challenge that the team can participate in, such as a fitness challenge, reading challenge, or creative project.
  • Set clear goals and guidelines for the challenge.
  • Create a dedicated chat or thread where team members can share their progress, experiences, and tips.
  • At the end of the challenge, host a virtual meeting to celebrate achievements and discuss the outcomes.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages long-term engagement and participation.
  • Promotes healthy habits and personal development.
  • Creates a sense of community and mutual support.

Example:

  • A month-long fitness challenge where team members track their daily steps and share their progress in a dedicated channel.

Personality Test Sharing

Team Size: 5+ people
Time: Any
Materials Needed: Personality tests (e.g., Myers-Briggs, Enneagram), video conferencing software

How to Play:

  • Ask team members to complete a personality test before the meeting.
  • During the virtual meeting, each team member shares their results and insights.
  • Discuss how different personality types complement each other and how the team can leverage individual strengths.

Why It’s Great:

  • Provides insights into team dynamics and individual preferences.
  • Enhances understanding and empathy among team members.
  • Can lead to better collaboration and communication.

Example:

  • Sharing Myers-Briggs results and discussing how different personality types can work together effectively.

Virtual Escape Room

Team Size: 3+ people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Online escape room service, video conferencing software

How to Play:

  • Choose an online escape room service and book a session for your team.
  • Gather the team on a video conferencing platform and share the escape room link.
  • Work together to solve puzzles and clues to “escape” the virtual room within the time limit.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages teamwork, problem-solving, and creative thinking.
  • Provides an exciting and immersive experience.
  • Helps build trust and communication skills.

Example:

  • Participating in a virtual escape room themed around a mystery or adventure story.

Remote Pictionary

Team Size: 4+ people
Time: 20–40 minutes
Materials Needed: Online drawing tool (e.g., Skribbl.io), video conferencing software

How to Play:

  • Use an online drawing tool like Skribbl.io to create a virtual Pictionary game.
  • Divide the team into two groups or have individuals compete.
  • Players take turns drawing a word or phrase while others guess what it is within a set time.
  • Points are awarded for correct guesses, and the team or player with the most points wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes creativity and quick thinking.
  • Encourages fun and laughter.
  • Enhances communication and interpretation skills.

Example:

  • Drawing prompts like “dinosaur,” “rocket ship,” or “birthday party.”

‘Pro-Tip’

Mix Up Activity Types: Incorporate a variety of games, including icebreakers, problem-solving tasks, creative challenges, and trust-building exercises. This ensures a well-rounded approach to team development.

Problem Solving Games

Problem-solving games are designed to improve critical thinking, collaboration, and innovative thinking within teams. These activities help team members develop their problem-solving skills in a fun and engaging way. Here are five excellent problem-solving games:

Your First Idea

Team Size: 5–12 people
Time: 10–20 minutes
Materials Needed: Paper, pens

How to Play:

  • Present a problem or challenge to the team. This could be a work-related issue or a fictional scenario.
  • Ask each team member to write down the first idea that comes to mind for solving the problem.
  • Collect all the ideas and review them as a group, discussing the merits and potential drawbacks of each one.
  • Optionally, you can also ask team members to write down their worst idea and discuss these as well.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages quick thinking and creativity.
  • Reduces the pressure to come up with a “perfect” solution.
  • Can lead to unexpected and innovative ideas.

Example:

  • Problem: How can we improve customer satisfaction? Ideas might include “faster response times,” “personalized service,” or “loyalty programs.”

Back of the Napkin

Team Size: 6–24 people
Time: 15–20 minutes
Materials Needed: Napkins or small pieces of paper, pens

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into groups of two to four people.
  • Present each group with an open-ended problem to solve. These can be work-related, imaginary, or even environmental problems.
  • Each group discusses the problem and sketches or writes their solution on a napkin.
  • After 15–20 minutes, groups present their solutions to the rest of the team.

Why It’s Great:

  • Simulates the spontaneity of coming up with ideas in casual settings.
  • Encourages collaboration and creativity.
  • Provides a quick and visual way to share ideas.

Example:

  • Problem: How can we reduce our company’s environmental footprint? Solutions might include “implementing recycling programs” or “switching to renewable energy sources.”

Create Your Own

Team Size: 5–12 people
Time: 30–60 minutes
Materials Needed: Paper, pens, any additional materials as needed

How to Play:

  • Each team member creates their own original problem-solving activity or game.
  • They then present their activity to the group and explain how it works.
  • If time permits, the team can participate in some of the activities.

Why It’s Great:

  • Allows team members to showcase their creativity and strengths.
  • Encourages innovation and out-of-the-box thinking.
  • Provides a diverse range of problem-solving challenges.

Example:

  • A team member might create a game where participants have to build the tallest tower using only paper and tape within a set time limit.

Spectrum Mapping

Team Size: 5–15 people
Time: 30–60 minutes
Materials Needed: Whiteboard, markers, sticky notes

How to Play:

  • Present the team with a few topics or issues to discuss.
  • Write these topics on a whiteboard and give everyone sticky notes and pens.
  • Ask team members to write down their thoughts or opinions on each topic and stick them under the respective headings.
  • Arrange the sticky notes on the whiteboard, grouping similar ideas together to the left and placing outliers to the right, creating a spectrum of opinions.

Why It’s Great:

  • Helps visualize the range of perspectives within the team.
  • Encourages open discussion and debate.
  • Can reveal underlying trends and insights.

Example:

  • Topic: “What are the most important factors for our company’s success?” Sticky notes might include “innovation,” “customer service,” “team collaboration,” and “cost efficiency.”

What Would “X” Do?

Team Size: 5–10 people
Time: 45–60 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Present the team with a problem or challenge.
  • Ask each team member to think of a famous person, leader, or someone they admire.
  • Each team member approaches the problem as if they were that person and presents their solution in character.
  • Discuss the different solutions and how the perspectives of various personas can provide unique insights.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creative thinking and empathy.
  • Provides fresh perspectives on solving problems.
  • It’s a fun and engaging way to approach challenges.

Example:

  • Problem: How can we increase employee engagement? Solutions might be presented as if by Steve Jobs, Oprah Winfrey, or a favorite teacher.

Team Pursuit

Team Size: 6–24 people
Time: 1–3 hours
Materials Needed: Depends on the challenges, timer, score sheet

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups of 2–6 people.
  • Prepare a series of challenges that test various skills such as logic, creativity, physical ability, and teamwork. These challenges can be puzzles, trivia questions, physical tasks, or creative exercises.
  • Each group competes to complete the challenges within a set time frame. Points are awarded based on performance.
  • The group with the highest score at the end wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages a wide range of skills and talents.
  • Fosters teamwork and friendly competition.
  • Provides a fun and engaging way to work on problem-solving and collaboration.

Example:

  • Challenges might include a trivia quiz, a timed obstacle course, and a creative task like building a tower with limited materials.

Code Break

Team Size: 8–24 people
Time: 1–3 hours
Materials Needed: Pre-made codes or puzzles, clues, and hints

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups and provide each group with a series of codes to break.
  • These codes can be in the form of ciphers, riddles, or physical puzzles that require teamwork and critical thinking to solve.
  • Each group works together to solve the codes within a set time limit.
  • The first group to break all the codes wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances analytical and critical thinking skills.
  • Promotes teamwork and collaboration under pressure.
  • Provides an engaging and challenging experience.

Example:

  • Groups might solve a series of cryptograms, unlock combinations with clues hidden around the room, or complete a sequence of logic puzzles.

Escape Room

Team Size: 3+ people
Time: 2–3 hours
Materials Needed: Booking at an escape room venue or online escape room software

How to Play:

  • Book an escape room session at a local venue or use an online escape room service.
  • Teams are “locked” in a themed room and must solve a series of puzzles and find clues to escape within a set time limit.
  • The team works together to solve the puzzles, communicate effectively, and manage their time.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages teamwork, communication, and problem-solving under pressure.
  • Provides a thrilling and immersive experience.
  • Helps team members practice creative thinking and collaboration.

Example:

  • Themes might include a haunted house, a spy mission, or a historical mystery.

Puzzle Challenge

Team Size: 4–12 people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Jigsaw puzzles, additional puzzle pieces mixed in from other sets

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups and give each group a jigsaw puzzle to complete.
  • Mix a few pieces from each group’s puzzle into other groups’ puzzles.
  • Teams must complete their puzzles by negotiating and trading pieces with other groups.
  • The first team to complete their puzzle wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes negotiation, communication, and teamwork.
  • Challenges team members to collaborate and think strategically.
  • Provides a fun and engaging way to work on problem-solving skills.

Example:

  • Teams might be working on different scenes, such as a cityscape, a nature scene, or a famous painting.

Marshmallow Challenge

Team Size: 8–16 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: 20 sticks of uncooked spaghetti, one yard of tape, one yard of string, one marshmallow per team

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into groups of 4–6 people.
  • Give each group 20 sticks of uncooked spaghetti, one yard of tape, one yard of string, and one marshmallow.
  • Teams have 18 minutes to build the tallest free-standing structure they can, with the marshmallow on top.
  • The tallest structure that holds the marshmallow wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity, innovation, and teamwork.
  • Teaches the importance of prototyping and iterative design.
  • Provides a hands-on and engaging challenge.

Example:

  • Teams might experiment with different structural designs, such as triangular bases or complex frameworks, to support the marshmallow.

‘Pro-Tip’

Keep It Fun and Lighthearted: Maintain a fun and lighthearted atmosphere during activities. Team building should be enjoyable and stress-free, fostering positive interactions and relationships.

Indoor Team Building Games

Indoor team-building games are perfect for fostering collaboration and communication within a controlled environment. These activities can be conducted in offices, conference rooms, or any indoor space. Here are six excellent indoor team-building games:

Perfect Square

Team Size: 4–12 people
Time: 15–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Blindfolds, rope

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into smaller groups of 4–6 people.
  • Provide each group with a long piece of rope and blindfolds for each member.
  • Have the group stand in a circle while holding the rope.
  • Ask everyone to put on their blindfolds and lay the rope on the ground.
  • The group’s task is to form a perfect square with the rope without removing their blindfolds.
  • Once they believe they’ve formed the square, they can remove their blindfolds to see how they did.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages communication and teamwork.
  • Enhances problem-solving and spatial awareness.
  • Promotes trust among team members.

Example:

  • Teams might use verbal cues like “step left” or “move your hand up” to coordinate the rope’s placement.

Memory Wall

Team Size: 5+ people
Time: 15–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Whiteboard or large paper, sticky notes, pens

How to Play:

  • Write several themes or topics related to work on a whiteboard or large paper (e.g., “First Day at Work,” “Team Celebration,” “Work Travel”).
  • Give each team member sticky notes and pens.
  • Ask everyone to write down their favorite memories or significant experiences related to each theme and stick them on the board.
  • Once all notes are up, team members take turns sharing their memories with the group.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages storytelling and sharing personal experiences.
  • Builds a sense of camaraderie and collective memory.
  • Provides an opportunity to celebrate successes and positive moments.

Example:

  • A sticky note might read, “Celebrated a big project completion with a team dinner” under the “Team Celebration” theme.

Turn Back Time

Team Size: 5–10 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Ask the team to sit in a circle in a quiet space.
  • Each team member takes a few minutes to think of a unique memory they’d like to relive if they could turn back time.
  • Going around the circle, each person shares their chosen memory and explains why it’s meaningful to them.
  • Encourage team members to listen actively and ask follow-up questions.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes vulnerability and deepens personal connections.
  • Encourages reflective thinking and active listening.
  • Helps build empathy and understanding among team members.

Example:

  • A team member might share, “I’d love to relive my graduation day because it was a culmination of years of hard work and my family was so proud.”

Paper Plane

Team Size: 6–12 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Card stock or paper, markers

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into groups of 2–4 people.
  • Give each group paper or card stock and markers.
  • Groups have 10–15 minutes to design and build the best long-distance paper plane and come up with a name for their airline.
  • After the planes are built, hold a competition to see whose plane flies the farthest.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity and innovation.
  • Promotes teamwork and collaboration.
  • Adds a fun and competitive element to the activity.

Example:

  • Teams might create different plane designs, such as a classic dart or a glider, and decorate them with their airline’s logo.

Build a Tower

Team Size: 8–16 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Uncooked spaghetti, marshmallows, tape, string

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into groups of 4–6 people.
  • Provide each group with 20 sticks of uncooked spaghetti, one yard of tape, one yard of string, and one marshmallow.
  • The goal is to build the tallest free-standing tower possible using only these materials, with the marshmallow on top.
  • Teams have 18 minutes to complete their tower. The tallest tower that holds the marshmallow wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity, innovation, and teamwork.
  • Teaches the importance of prototyping and iterative design.
  • Provides a hands-on and engaging challenge.

Example:

  • Teams might experiment with different structural designs, such as triangular bases or complex frameworks, to support the marshmallow.

Flip It Over

Team Size: 6–8 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Towel, blanket, or sheet

How to Play:

  • Lay a towel, blanket, or sheet on the floor and have the team stand on it.
  • The objective is to flip the fabric over without anyone stepping off or touching the ground.
  • Team members must communicate and coordinate their movements to achieve this task.
  • To increase the difficulty, use a smaller piece of fabric or add more people to the team.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages clear communication and cooperation.
  • Promotes problem-solving and strategic thinking.
  • Requires teamwork and coordination.

Example:

  • Teams might try different strategies, such as shifting weight to one side or carefully folding parts of the fabric to flip it over without stepping off.

Sneak a Peek

Team Size: 4–20 people
Time: 30 minutes
Materials Needed: Lego sets or building blocks

How to Play:

  • Create a structure using Lego blocks and hide it from view.
  • Divide the team into groups of 2–4 people and give each group the same number of Lego pieces.
  • One person from each group gets 10 seconds to “sneak a peek” at the hidden structure and then returns to their group to describe what they saw.
  • The group then attempts to recreate the structure based on the description.
  • The process continues with different group members taking turns to sneak a peek until the time is up or the structure is completed.
  • The group with the most accurate replica wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances communication and memory skills.
  • Encourages teamwork and precise verbal descriptions.
  • Promotes attention to detail.

Example:

  • A person might describe a structure with a red base, a blue tower, and a yellow flag on top.

Pyramids

Team Size: 8–24 people
Time: 30 minutes
Materials Needed: Paper cups, timer

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into groups of 4–6 people.
  • Give each group 10 paper cups.
  • The first person in each group builds a pyramid with the cups, starting with four cups at the base, three on the next level, two on the next, and one on top.
  • Once completed, they must carefully carry the pyramid to the next person in line, who then disassembles and reassembles the pyramid.
  • Continue this relay until everyone has had a turn.
  • The team that completes the relay first wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes teamwork, coordination, and communication.
  • Encourages careful handling and steady hands.
  • Adds a competitive element to the activity.

Example:

  • Groups might develop strategies to carry the pyramid quickly without toppling it.

Team Flag

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 30–45 minutes
Materials Needed: Paper, markers, crayons, other art supplies

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into groups of 2–4 people.
  • Provide each group with art supplies and paper.
  • Each group designs a flag that represents their team, incorporating elements that reflect their shared values, goals, or interests.
  • Once completed, each group presents their flag to the rest of the team, explaining the design and symbolism.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity and collaboration.
  • Helps teams identify and express their values and identity.
  • Promotes presentation and storytelling skills.

Example:

  • A team flag might include symbols like a tree (growth), a star (excellence), or a handshake (collaboration).

Salt and Pepper

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 45–60 minutes
Materials Needed: Index cards, tape, pens

How to Play:

  • Write pairs of items that go together on separate index cards (e.g., salt and pepper, left sock and right sock, day and night).
  • Tape one card to the back of each participant.
  • Participants must find their pair by asking yes/no questions about what’s written on their back.
  • Once pairs are found, they sit down together and share something about themselves.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes mingling and communication.
  • Encourages team members to engage with everyone.
  • Provides a fun and interactive way to learn about each other.

Example:

  • A participant might ask, “Am I something you eat?” or “Am I found in the kitchen?” to determine they are “salt.”

Sell It

Team Size: 3+ people
Time: 45–90 minutes
Materials Needed: Random objects, pens, paper

How to Play:

  • Ask each team member to bring a random object from their desk or home.
  • Each person or group must come up with a logo, slogan, and marketing plan to sell the object.
  • After 30 minutes, each team presents their product pitch to the rest of the group.
  • The team with the most convincing pitch wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity and marketing skills.
  • Promotes teamwork and collaboration.
  • Provides a fun and competitive environment.

Example:

  • Someone might bring a stapler and pitch it as “The Staple of Your Office” with a sleek design and easy functionality.

Barter Puzzle

Team Size: 4–12 people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Jigsaw puzzles with some pieces mixed up

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into groups of 3–4 people and give each group a jigsaw puzzle with some pieces mixed into other groups’ puzzles.
  • Teams must complete their puzzles by negotiating and trading pieces with other groups.
  • Every decision must be made as a group.
  • The first team to complete their puzzle wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes negotiation, communication, and teamwork.
  • Encourages strategic thinking and problem-solving.
  • Adds a fun and competitive element to the activity.

Example:

  • Teams might trade pieces based on the color or shape needed to complete their sections of the puzzle.

Office Bingo

Team Size: 6+ people
Time: Any
Materials Needed: Pre-made bingo cards, pens

How to Play:

  • Create bingo cards with common office activities or phrases (e.g., “sent an email,” “attended a meeting,” “used the copier”).
  • Distribute the cards to team members at the beginning of the day or week.
  • Players mark off activities as they complete them or hear them during the day.
  • The first person to complete a row, column, or diagonal wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Adds a fun and engaging element to the workday.
  • Encourages observation and participation.
  • Provides a casual and interactive way to bond with colleagues.

Example:

  • Bingo squares might include “replied to an email,” “gave a presentation,” or “had a coffee break.”

Human Knot

Team Size: 8–20 people
Time: 15–30 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Have the team stand in a circle and extend their hands into the center.
  • Each person grabs the hand of someone across the circle, creating a “knot” of intertwined arms.
  • The group’s task is to untangle themselves into a single circle without letting go of each other’s hands.
  • This requires communication, cooperation, and strategic movement.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes teamwork and problem-solving.
  • Encourages physical coordination and communication.
  • Provides a fun and interactive challenge.

Example:

  • Participants might need to step over or under each other’s arms and communicate effectively to untangle the knot.

Blind Drawing

Team Size: 4+ people
Time: 10–20 minutes
Materials Needed: Paper, pens or markers, pre-drawn images or shapes

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into pairs.
  • One person in each pair is given a picture of a simple object or shape (e.g., a house, a flower, a car) which they must describe to their partner without revealing what it is.
  • The other person listens to the description and draws what they think the object looks like based on the description.
  • Compare the drawings to the original pictures to see how accurate they are.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances communication and listening skills.
  • Encourages clear and detailed verbal descriptions.
  • Promotes teamwork and creativity.

Example:

  • A person might describe a simple house with a triangular roof, rectangular windows, and a door.

Team Scavenger Hunt

Team Size: 8+ people
Time: 30–60 minutes
Materials Needed: List of items to find, paper, pens, or smartphones for taking photos

How to Play:

  • Create a list of items for the teams to find within the office or indoor space (e.g., a stapler, a coffee mug, a specific book, a plant).
  • Divide the team into smaller groups and give each group the list of items.
  • Set a time limit for the scavenger hunt.
  • Teams must find the items and either collect them or take photos as proof.
  • The team that finds the most items within the time limit wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes teamwork and problem-solving.
  • Encourages quick thinking and resourcefulness.
  • Adds a fun and competitive element to the activity.

Example:

  • Items on the list might include “a red pen,” “a photo of the team,” or “a document with the company logo.”

Tower of Hanoi

Team Size: 3–6 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Tower of Hanoi puzzle (can be made with discs and a stand)

How to Play:

  • The Tower of Hanoi is a puzzle consisting of three rods and a number of different-sized discs, which can slide onto any rod.
  • The puzzle starts with the discs stacked in ascending order of size on one rod, with the smallest disc at the top.
  • The objective is to move the entire stack to another rod, adhering to the following rules:
    • Only one disc can be moved at a time.
    • Each move consists of taking the upper disc from one of the stacks and placing it on top of another stack or an empty rod.
    • No larger disc may be placed on top of a smaller disc.
  • Teams work together to solve the puzzle in the least number of moves.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances problem-solving and strategic thinking skills.
  • Encourages teamwork and collaboration.
  • Provides a challenging and engaging mental exercise.

Example:

  • Teams might develop different strategies and discuss the best way to move the discs efficiently.

Group Juggle

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 15–20 minutes
Materials Needed: Soft balls or beanbags

How to Play:

  • Have the team stand in a circle.
  • Start with one ball and toss it to someone across the circle, calling out their name before tossing it.
  • That person catches the ball and tosses it to another person, calling out their name, and so on.
  • Once everyone has caught and thrown the ball, add another ball into the mix, repeating the same sequence.
  • Continue adding more balls to increase the challenge.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances communication and coordination.
  • Promotes quick thinking and teamwork.
  • Adds a fun and dynamic element to the activity.

Example:

  • The group might start with one ball and gradually work up to juggling four or five balls simultaneously.

All Aboard

Team Size: 6–12 people
Time: 15–30 minutes
Materials Needed: A small platform or piece of fabric

How to Play:

  • Place a small platform or piece of fabric on the ground. This represents the “boat.”
  • Ask the entire team to stand on the “boat” and balance without anyone stepping off.
  • Gradually make the platform smaller by folding the fabric or using a smaller platform.
  • The team must work together to stay “aboard” without anyone stepping off.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes teamwork and problem-solving.
  • Encourages creativity and strategic thinking.
  • Builds trust and cooperation.

Example:

  • Teams might strategize on how to distribute their weight and position themselves to fit on the increasingly smaller platform.

Trust Fall

Team Size: 6+ people
Time: 10–20 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Have team members form a circle with one person standing in the middle.
  • The person in the middle crosses their arms over their chest and keeps their body rigid.
  • They fall backward or to the side, trusting the team members in the circle to catch them and gently push them back to an upright position.
  • Rotate so everyone gets a turn in the middle.

Why It’s Great:

  • Builds trust and cooperation.
  • Encourages communication and mutual support.
  • Provides a safe environment to practice trust.

Example:

  • Team members might give verbal reassurances and communicate to ensure everyone is ready to catch the person falling.

‘Pro-Tip’

Be Flexible and Adaptable: Be prepared to adapt activities on the fly based on the team’s dynamics and responses. Flexibility ensures that the activities remain effective and enjoyable for everyone.

Outdoor Team Building Games

Outdoor team-building games provide a refreshing change of scenery and an opportunity for teams to engage in physical activities. These games can help enhance teamwork, communication, and problem-solving skills while enjoying the great outdoors. Here are seven excellent outdoor team-building games:

The Minefield

Team Size: 4–10 people
Time: 15–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Various objects to create a “minefield” (e.g., cones, balls, bottles), blindfolds

How to Play:

  • Set up a “minefield” in an open outdoor area using various objects.
  • Divide the team into pairs. One person from each pair is blindfolded, while the other is the guide.
  • The guide verbally directs the blindfolded person through the minefield without them touching any of the objects.
  • If the blindfolded person touches an object, they must start over.
  • Switch roles and repeat.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances communication and trust.
  • Encourages careful listening and precise instructions.
  • Builds cooperation and teamwork.

Example:

  • A guide might say, “Take two steps forward, then step to your left” to help their partner navigate the minefield.

Earth-ball

Team Size: 5–20 people
Time: 15–45 minutes
Materials Needed: Large inflatable ball or beach ball

How to Play:

  • Have the team stand in a circle and introduce the large ball.
  • The objective is to keep the ball in the air for as long as possible.
  • No one is allowed to touch the ball twice in a row.
  • To make it more challenging, set a goal for the number of touches without the ball hitting the ground.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes teamwork and coordination.
  • Encourages communication and quick reflexes.
  • Adds a fun and active element to team building.

Example:

  • The team might strategize to use gentle taps to keep the ball in the air longer.

Scavenger Hunt

Team Size: 8+ people
Time: 45–90 minutes
Materials Needed: List of items to find, bags for collecting items, pens, and paper

How to Play:

  • Create a list of items for the teams to find within a designated outdoor area (e.g., a park, campus, or neighborhood).
  • Divide the team into smaller groups and give each group the list of items.
  • Set a time limit for the scavenger hunt.
  • Teams must find the items on the list and either collect them or take photos as proof.
  • The team that finds the most items within the time limit wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages teamwork and problem-solving.
  • Promotes quick thinking and resourcefulness.
  • Adds a fun and competitive element to the activity.

Example:

  • Items on the list might include “a pinecone,” “a picture of a bird,” or “a red flower.”

Egg Drop

Team Size: 4–12 people
Time: 60–90 minutes
Materials Needed: Raw eggs, various building materials (e.g., straws, tape, newspaper, balloons)

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into groups of 2–3 people.
  • Give each group a raw egg and various building materials.
  • The objective is to create a structure that will protect the egg from breaking when dropped from a certain height.
  • Each group has 30–60 minutes to build their structure.
  • After the time is up, groups drop their structures from the designated height to see if their egg survives.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity, innovation, and teamwork.
  • Teaches problem-solving and engineering principles.
  • Provides a hands-on and engaging challenge.

Example:

  • Teams might use straws to create a protective cage around the egg or use balloons to cushion the fall.

Team Outing

Team Size: Any
Time: Any
Materials Needed: Depends on the activity

How to Play:

  • Plan an outing for your team. This could be a trip to a local attraction, a nature hike, a sports game, or an adventure park.
  • Choose an activity that everyone can enjoy and participate in.
  • Encourage team members to interact and bond during the outing.
  • Consider organizing group activities or challenges during the outing to foster teamwork.

Why It’s Great:

  • Provides a break from the usual work environment.
  • Encourages team bonding and casual interactions.
  • Creates shared experiences and memories.

Example:

  • A team might go for a hike in a nearby park, visit a local museum, or participate in a ropes course challenge.

Volunteer as a Team

Team Size: 5+ people
Time: Any
Materials Needed: Depends on the volunteer activity

How to Play:

  • Organize a volunteer event for your team. This could be a charity event, a community clean-up, or working at a local food bank.
  • Choose a cause that resonates with your team and aligns with your company values.
  • Encourage team members to participate and work together during the event.
  • Reflect on the experience afterward and discuss the impact of the volunteer work.

Why It’s Great:

  • Builds a sense of community and purpose.
  • Encourages teamwork and collaboration.
  • Provides an opportunity to give back and make a positive impact.

Example:

  • A team might participate in a beach clean-up, plant trees in a local park, or serve meals at a homeless shelter.

Tug of War

Team Size: 8+ people
Time: 10–20 minutes
Materials Needed: Tug of war rope, markers for boundaries

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into two equal groups.
  • Have the groups stand on opposite sides of the rope.
  • Mark a center line and boundaries on the ground.
  • On the signal, both teams pull on the rope, trying to drag the other team across the center line.
  • The team that pulls the other team across the center line wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages teamwork and physical activity.
  • Promotes friendly competition and coordination.
  • Provides a fun and energetic challenge.

Example:

  • Teams might develop strategies for pulling in unison and positioning stronger members at key points along the rope.

Obstacle Course

Team Size: 8–20 people
Time: 30–60 minutes
Materials Needed: Various obstacles (e.g., cones, ropes, tires, planks)

How to Play:

  • Set up an obstacle course with a series of physical challenges that team members must navigate (e.g., crawling under ropes, jumping over hurdles, balancing on beams).
  • Divide the team into smaller groups or pairs.
  • Each group or pair takes turns navigating the obstacle course.
  • You can time each group and the fastest group to complete the course wins, or simply focus on completion and teamwork.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes physical fitness and coordination.
  • Encourages teamwork and mutual support.
  • Adds a fun and competitive element to the activity.

Example:

  • Obstacles might include a tire run, a balance beam, a rope climb, and a tunnel crawl.

Field Day Games

Team Size: 10+ people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Various sports equipment (e.g., balls, hula hoops, sacks)

How to Play:

  • Organize a series of classic field day games such as sack races, three-legged races, tug of war, and hula hoop contests.
  • Divide the team into smaller groups and rotate through the different games.
  • Keep score for each game and tally the points to determine the overall winning team.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages physical activity and friendly competition.
  • Provides a variety of fun and engaging challenges.
  • Promotes team spirit and camaraderie.

Example:

  • Teams might compete in a sack race, where participants hop to the finish line while inside a sack.

Relay Races

Team Size: 8+ people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Relay batons or any items that can be passed between team members

How to Play:

  • Set up a course with designated start and finish lines.
  • Divide the team into equal groups.
  • Each team member must complete a portion of the course, passing the baton to the next runner in line.
  • The team that completes the relay first wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes physical fitness and coordination.
  • Encourages teamwork and communication.
  • Adds excitement and a competitive element to the activity.

Example:

  • Teams might have to run, skip, or even perform a specific task (e.g., carrying a water balloon) before passing the baton.

Capture the Flag

Team Size: 10+ people
Time: 30–60 minutes
Materials Needed: Two flags, markers for boundaries

How to Play:

  • Divide the playing area into two equal territories and place a flag in each territory.
  • Split the team into two groups, each defending their flag while trying to capture the opponent’s flag.
  • Players who cross into the opponent’s territory can be tagged and sent to a designated “jail” area.
  • The first team to capture the opponent’s flag and bring it back to their own territory wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages strategic thinking and teamwork.
  • Promotes physical activity and coordination.
  • Adds an element of adventure and excitement.

Example:

  • Teams might strategize on how to best defend their flag while coordinating stealthy attacks on the opponent’s flag.

Geocaching Adventure

Team Size: 4+ people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: GPS devices or smartphones with geocaching apps

How to Play:

  • Set up a series of geocaches (hidden containers) in an outdoor area with GPS coordinates for each location.
  • Divide the team into smaller groups and provide the GPS coordinates.
  • Teams must navigate to each location, find the geocache, and complete any challenges or tasks inside.
  • The team that finds the most geocaches or completes the course in the shortest time wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages navigation and problem-solving skills.
  • Promotes teamwork and outdoor exploration.
  • Provides a fun and engaging treasure hunt experience.

Example:

  • Geocaches might contain puzzles, clues to the next location, or small prizes.

Nature Hike

Team Size: Any
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: None, optional hiking gear (e.g., comfortable shoes, water bottles)

How to Play:

  • Plan a hike along a local trail, park, or nature reserve.
  • Encourage team members to enjoy the natural surroundings and engage in casual conversation.
  • Optionally, you can incorporate activities such as a nature scavenger hunt or group discussions during the hike.

Why It’s Great:

  • Provides a relaxing and healthy outdoor activity.
  • Encourages casual interactions and bonding.
  • Allows team members to enjoy nature and de-stress.

Example:

  • Teams might look for specific plants, animals, or landmarks during the hike.

Sports Day

Team Size: 10+ people
Time: 1–3 hours
Materials Needed: Sports equipment (e.g., soccer balls, volleyballs, basketballs)

How to Play:

  • Organize a sports day with a variety of sports activities such as soccer, volleyball, basketball, or softball.
  • Divide the team into smaller groups and rotate through the different sports.
  • Keep score for each game and determine the overall winning team at the end of the day.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes physical fitness and teamwork.
  • Encourages friendly competition and sportsmanship.
  • Provides a variety of fun and engaging activities.

Example:

  • Teams might compete in a round-robin soccer tournament or play a friendly game of volleyball.

Kayaking or Canoeing

Team Size: 6+ people
Time: 2–4 hours
Materials Needed: Kayaks or canoes, life jackets, paddles

How to Play:

  • Arrange a kayaking or canoeing trip on a local lake, river, or sea.
  • Divide the team into pairs or small groups, each with a kayak or canoe.
  • Set a route for the teams to follow, which can include specific checkpoints or a race to a finish line.
  • Emphasize safety and ensure everyone wears life jackets.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages teamwork and coordination.
  • Provides physical exercise and outdoor adventure.
  • Builds trust and communication among team members.

Example:

  • Teams might paddle to a specific point on the lake, collect a flag, and return to the starting point.

Adventure Park Challenge

Team Size: 6+ people
Time: 2–4 hours
Materials Needed: Access to an adventure park (e.g., ropes course, zip lines, climbing walls)

How to Play:

  • Arrange a visit to a local adventure park.
  • Teams navigate various challenges such as ropes courses, zip lines, and climbing walls.
  • Encourage team members to support and cheer each other on throughout the challenges.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes teamwork and mutual support.
  • Provides physical exercise and adrenaline-pumping fun.
  • Encourages team members to step out of their comfort zones.

Example:

  • Teams might navigate a high ropes course, helping each other overcome obstacles and reach the end.

Outdoor Cooking Challenge

Team Size: 6–12 people
Time: 2–3 hours
Materials Needed: Cooking supplies, portable stoves or grills, ingredients

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups and provide each group with cooking supplies and ingredients.
  • Set a theme or type of meal for the challenge (e.g., best barbecue, most creative dessert).
  • Groups cook their meals within a set time limit.
  • Teams present their dishes for tasting and a panel of judges (or all team members) votes on the best dish.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity and collaboration.
  • Promotes teamwork in a fun and relaxed setting.
  • Provides an opportunity to enjoy and share a meal together.

Example:

  • Teams might prepare a three-course meal using only the ingredients provided, and the dishes are judged on taste, presentation, and creativity.

Paintball

Team Size: 10+ people
Time: 2–4 hours
Materials Needed: Paintball guns, paintballs, protective gear, access to a paintball field

How to Play:

  • Arrange a paintball session at a local paintball field.
  • Divide the team into two or more groups.
  • Teams compete in various paintball scenarios, such as capture the flag, elimination, or defend the base.
  • Emphasize safety and ensure everyone wears protective gear.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes teamwork and strategic thinking.
  • Encourages physical activity and friendly competition.
  • Provides an adrenaline-pumping, fun-filled experience.

Example:

  • Teams might strategize on how to capture the opponent’s flag while defending their own base.

Picnic Games

Team Size: 8+ people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Various picnic games equipment (e.g., frisbees, badminton sets, bocce balls, blankets)

How to Play:

  • Organize a picnic in a park or outdoor space and set up various games and activities.
  • Include classic picnic games such as frisbee toss, badminton, bocce ball, sack races, and tug of war.
  • Encourage team members to participate in multiple games and activities.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes relaxation and casual interaction.
  • Encourages physical activity and friendly competition.
  • Provides a fun and laid-back environment for team bonding.

Example:

  • Teams might compete in a friendly game of bocce ball or participate in a sack race.

Frisbee Golf

Team Size: 4+ people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Frisbees, access to a disc golf course

How to Play:

  • Arrange a game of frisbee golf (disc golf) at a local disc golf course.
  • Divide the team into smaller groups or pairs.
  • Teams navigate the course, aiming to complete each hole in the fewest throws.
  • The team or player with the lowest score at the end of the course wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes physical activity and coordination.
  • Encourages teamwork and friendly competition.
  • Provides a relaxing and enjoyable outdoor experience.

Example:

  • Teams might strategize on the best throwing techniques and routes to complete the course efficiently.

‘Pro-Tip’

Encourage Team Collaboration: Focus on activities that require collaboration and teamwork rather than competition. This helps build a sense of unity and collective achievement.

Communication Games

Communication games are designed to enhance the communication skills of team members, fostering better understanding, collaboration, and teamwork. Here are five engaging communication games:

Blindfold Maze

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Blindfolds, objects to create a maze (e.g., cones, chairs, ropes)

How to Play:

  • Set up a maze or obstacle course using various objects in an open space.
  • Divide the team into pairs, with one person in each pair blindfolded.
  • The sighted partner must guide the blindfolded partner through the maze using only verbal instructions.
  • The goal is to navigate the maze without touching any obstacles.
  • Switch roles and repeat.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances verbal communication and listening skills.
  • Builds trust and cooperation.
  • Encourages clear and concise instructions.

Example:

  • The guide might say, “Take two steps to your left, now step forward three steps.”

Lost at Sea

Team Size: 5–10 people
Time: 30–45 minutes
Materials Needed: Scenario card, list of items

How to Play:

  • Present the team with a scenario where they are stranded on a sinking ship with limited time to abandon it.
  • Provide a list of items available on the ship (e.g., water, food, rope, map).
  • The team must discuss and decide which items to take to ensure their survival.
  • Encourage open discussion and reasoning for choosing each item.
  • After the discussion, compare the team’s choices with expert recommendations for survival.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes critical thinking and problem-solving.
  • Encourages open communication and collaboration.
  • Enhances decision-making skills.

Example:

  • Teams might debate whether to take a map for navigation or extra food for sustenance.

The Listening Game

Team Size: 5–15 people
Time: 15–20 minutes
Materials Needed: Short story or passage, questions about the passage

How to Play:

  • Read a short story or passage to the team.
  • After reading, ask specific questions about the details of the story.
  • Team members must answer the questions based on their recollection.
  • Discuss the answers and highlight the importance of active listening.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances active listening and attention to detail.
  • Encourages focus and concentration.
  • Promotes better communication and understanding.

Example:

  • Questions might include, “What was the color of the main character’s shirt?” or “What did the character do after leaving the house?”

Follow the Instructions

Team Size: 5–20 people
Time: 15–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Paper, pens, pre-written instructions

How to Play:

  • Provide each team member with a piece of paper and a pen.
  • Read a series of instructions aloud, one step at a time (e.g., “Draw a square in the center of the paper, then draw a triangle on top of the square”).
  • Team members must follow the instructions without asking questions or discussing.
  • Compare the drawings at the end to see how accurately the instructions were followed.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances listening and comprehension skills.
  • Highlights the importance of clear and precise instructions.
  • Encourages attention to detail.

Example:

  • Instructions might include, “Draw a circle inside the square, then draw a small star in the top right corner of the paper.”

Mirror Image

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 15–20 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into pairs and have them stand facing each other.
  • One person in each pair is the leader, and the other is the mirror.
  • The leader makes slow, deliberate movements, and the mirror must mimic them as closely as possible.
  • After a few minutes, switch roles.
  • Discuss the experience and the importance of non-verbal communication.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances non-verbal communication and observation skills.
  • Builds empathy and understanding.
  • Encourages synchronization and cooperation.

Example:

  • The leader might slowly raise their arm, tilt their head, or take a step to the side, and the mirror must follow exactly.

The Great Egg Drop

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 30–45 minutes
Materials Needed: Raw eggs, various building materials (e.g., straws, tape, newspapers, plastic bags)

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups of 3–5 people.
  • Provide each group with a raw egg and building materials.
  • The objective is to create a protective structure around the egg to prevent it from breaking when dropped from a height.
  • Each group has 20–30 minutes to build their structure.
  • After the time is up, groups drop their structures from a designated height and see if the egg survives.
  • Discuss the designs and strategies used by different teams.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes creativity, problem-solving, and teamwork.
  • Encourages communication and collaboration.
  • Provides a fun and engaging challenge.

Example:

  • Teams might use straws to create a cushioning cage or use plastic bags as parachutes to slow the egg’s descent.

Storytelling Round

Team Size: 5–15 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Have the team sit in a circle.
  • One person starts a story with a single sentence.
  • Each subsequent person adds one sentence to continue the story.
  • The story continues around the circle until everyone has contributed several times or the story reaches a natural conclusion.
  • Reflect on the story and discuss the importance of listening and building on others’ ideas.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances listening and creativity.
  • Encourages team members to build on each other’s ideas.
  • Promotes collaboration and collective storytelling.

Example:

  • The story might start with, “Once upon a time, in a small village by the sea, there lived a fisherman who loved to sing.”

Taboo

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Taboo cards (pre-made or bought), timer

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into two groups.
  • One person from the first group picks a card with a word at the top and a list of “taboo” words they cannot say while describing the top word.
  • The person has one minute to get their team to guess the top word without using any of the taboo words.
  • If the team guesses correctly, they get a point.
  • Alternate turns between the teams.
  • The team with the most points at the end wins.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances verbal communication and quick thinking.
  • Encourages creativity in describing words.
  • Promotes teamwork and friendly competition.

Example:

  • If the word is “banana,” the taboo words might include “fruit,” “yellow,” “peel,” and “monkey.” The person might say, “This is a long, curved fruit that monkeys love to eat.”

Telephone

Team Size: 5–20 people
Time: 10–15 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Have the team sit in a circle.
  • One person whispers a message into the ear of the person next to them.
  • The message is passed around the circle, with each person whispering it to their neighbor.
  • The last person says the message out loud to see how much it has changed from the original.
  • Discuss the differences and the importance of clear communication.

Why It’s Great:

  • Highlights the challenges of accurate communication.
  • Encourages listening and attention to detail.
  • Provides a fun and often humorous activity.

Example:

  • The original message might be, “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog,” and it could change to something like, “The brown dog sleeps over the fox.”

Speed Networking

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Timer, list of questions or prompts

How to Play:

  • Set up a space where participants can pair up and face each other.
  • Each pair has 2–3 minutes to introduce themselves and discuss a specific question or prompt.
  • After the time is up, participants rotate to the next person.
  • Continue until everyone has had a chance to meet and speak with several others.
  • Discuss the experience and what was learned about each other.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances networking and interpersonal skills.
  • Encourages quick thinking and focused conversation.
  • Promotes getting to know each other in a short amount of time.

Example:

  • Prompts might include, “What’s your favorite hobby and why?” or “Describe a memorable experience from your career.”

‘Pro-Tip’

Foster an Inclusive Environment: Make sure all team members feel included and comfortable participating. Consider any physical limitations or personality differences when planning activities.

Creative Games

Creative games are designed to stimulate imagination, innovation, and artistic expression within a team. These activities encourage team members to think outside the box, collaborate creatively, and have fun. Here are five engaging creative games:

Collaborative Drawing

Team Size: 4–12 people
Time: 15–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Large sheets of paper, markers, pens, or crayons

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups of 2–4 people.
  • Give each group a large sheet of paper and drawing materials.
  • One person in each group starts by drawing a simple shape or line on the paper.
  • Each team member takes turns adding to the drawing, one element at a time, until the time is up or the drawing is complete.
  • Once finished, each group presents their collaborative drawing to the rest of the team and explains their creative process.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity and artistic expression.
  • Promotes teamwork and collaboration.
  • Provides a fun and relaxed environment for creative thinking.

Example:

  • The drawing might start with a simple circle and evolve into a complex scene with trees, animals, and abstract shapes.

Build a Story

Team Size: 5–15 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Have the team sit in a circle.
  • One person starts a story with a single sentence.
  • Each subsequent person adds one sentence to continue the story.
  • The story continues around the circle until everyone has contributed several times or the story reaches a natural conclusion.
  • Reflect on the story and discuss the creative elements that emerged.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances creativity and storytelling skills.
  • Encourages team members to build on each other’s ideas.
  • Promotes collaboration and collective creativity.

Example:

  • The story might start with, “Once upon a time, in a small village by the sea, there lived a fisherman who loved to sing,” and develop into an epic adventure involving treasure hunts and sea monsters.

Costume Contest

Team Size: Any
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Costume materials (e.g., clothes, props, accessories), prizes for winners

How to Play:

  • Announce a costume contest with a specific theme (e.g., favorite movie characters, superheroes, historical figures).
  • Give team members time to create their costumes.
  • Hold a fashion show where each participant presents their costume and explains their character.
  • Have a panel of judges or the entire team vote on the best costumes in various categories (e.g., most creative, funniest, best overall).
  • Award prizes to the winners.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity and self-expression.
  • Promotes a fun and festive atmosphere.
  • Provides an opportunity for team members to showcase their talents and personalities.

Example:

  • Themes might include “Hollywood Night,” “Cartoon Characters,” or “Decades Party.”

Lip Sync Battle

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Music, microphone, props (optional)

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into pairs or small groups.
  • Each group selects a song and prepares a lip sync performance.
  • Performances can include choreography, props, and costumes for added fun.
  • Hold the lip sync battle, with each group performing their song.
  • Have a panel of judges or the entire team vote on the best performances in various categories (e.g., most entertaining, best choreography, most creative).
  • Award prizes to the winners.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity and performance skills.
  • Promotes team bonding and fun.
  • Provides an opportunity for team members to showcase their talents and entertain each other.

Example:

  • Teams might perform popular songs like “Bohemian Rhapsody” by Queen, “Thriller” by Michael Jackson, or “Uptown Funk” by Bruno Mars.

DIY Craft Challenge

Team Size: 4–12 people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Craft supplies (e.g., paper, glue, scissors, paint, beads)

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups of 2–4 people.
  • Provide each group with a set of craft supplies and a theme or challenge (e.g., create a holiday decoration, design a team mascot).
  • Each group has a set time to create their craft project.
  • Once the time is up, each group presents their creation to the rest of the team and explains their creative process.
  • Have a panel of judges or the entire team vote on the best projects in various categories (e.g., most creative, best use of materials, most thematic).
  • Award prizes to the winners.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity and artistic expression.
  • Promotes teamwork and collaboration.
  • Provides a fun and hands-on creative challenge.

Example:

  • Teams might create a holiday wreath, a team mascot sculpture, or a decorative centerpiece using the provided materials.

Creative Pitch

Team Size: 4–12 people
Time: 45–60 minutes
Materials Needed: Paper, pens, props (optional)

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups of 2–4 people.
  • Provide each group with a random product or concept to develop a creative pitch for. These can be everyday objects or entirely fictional products.
  • Each group brainstorms and creates a pitch, including a unique selling proposition, target audience, and marketing strategy.
  • Groups present their pitches to the rest of the team.
  • Have a panel of judges or the entire team vote on the most convincing and creative pitches.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creative thinking and problem-solving.
  • Enhances presentation and persuasion skills.
  • Promotes teamwork and collaboration.

Example:

  • Teams might pitch a new type of energy drink, a futuristic kitchen gadget, or an eco-friendly travel accessory.

Themed Photo Shoot

Team Size: 4–12 people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Cameras or smartphones, costumes, props

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups of 2–4 people.
  • Assign each group a theme for their photo shoot (e.g., 1920s, superheroes, beach party).
  • Provide a variety of costumes and props that fit the themes.
  • Each group plans and conducts a photo shoot, taking pictures that creatively interpret their theme.
  • After the photo shoot, each group presents their best photos to the rest of the team.
  • Have a panel of judges or the entire team vote on the best photos in various categories (e.g., most creative, best use of props, best overall).

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity and artistic expression.
  • Promotes teamwork and collaboration.
  • Provides a fun and engaging activity that results in memorable photos.

Example:

  • A group assigned the “superheroes” theme might dress up in capes and masks, striking heroic poses in various locations.

DIY Movie Trailer

Team Size: 4–12 people
Time: 2–3 hours
Materials Needed: Cameras or smartphones, props, costumes, video editing software (optional)

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups of 2–4 people.
  • Each group selects a genre (e.g., horror, comedy, action) and creates a short movie trailer.
  • Groups write a brief script, plan scenes, and film their trailer using costumes and props.
  • If possible, groups can edit their footage using basic video editing software to add music and effects.
  • Each group presents their trailer to the rest of the team.
  • Have a panel of judges or the entire team vote on the best trailers in various categories (e.g., most entertaining, best editing, best acting).

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity and storytelling skills.
  • Promotes teamwork and collaboration.
  • Provides a fun and engaging challenge with tangible results.

Example:

  • A group might create a comedic trailer about a group of office workers turned superheroes, using office supplies as their “weapons.”

Ad Campaign Challenge

Team Size: 4–12 people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Paper, pens, markers, props, costumes

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups of 2–4 people.
  • Assign each group a product or service to create an ad campaign for.
  • Each group brainstorms and develops a comprehensive ad campaign, including print ads, a slogan, and a 30-second commercial.
  • Groups can use props and costumes to create and present their commercials.
  • Each group presents their ad campaign to the rest of the team.
  • Have a panel of judges or the entire team vote on the most creative and effective campaigns.

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creative thinking and marketing skills.
  • Enhances presentation and persuasion skills.
  • Promotes teamwork and collaboration.

Example:

  • A group might create an ad campaign for a new eco-friendly water bottle, featuring a catchy slogan and a commercial highlighting its benefits.

Team Songwriting

Team Size: 4–12 people
Time: 1–2 hours
Materials Needed: Paper, pens, musical instruments (optional)

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups of 2–4 people.
  • Each group writes a song on a given theme or topic (e.g., team spirit, company values, a recent project).
  • Groups can create lyrics, melodies, and even simple choreography if desired.
  • If musical instruments are available, groups can use them to accompany their songs.
  • Each group performs their song for the rest of the team.
  • Have a panel of judges or the entire team vote on the best songs in various categories (e.g., most creative, best performance, most meaningful lyrics).

Why It’s Great:

  • Encourages creativity and musical expression.
  • Promotes teamwork and collaboration.
  • Provides a fun and engaging activity that results in memorable performances.

Example:

  • A group might write a song about the importance of teamwork, incorporating funny and relatable anecdotes from their workplace.

‘Pro-Tip’

Encourage Open Communication: Promote open and honest communication during and after activities. This helps team members express their thoughts and feelings, enhancing the overall team-building experience.

Trust-Building Games

Trust-building games are designed to foster trust, cooperation, and a sense of safety within a team. These activities help team members develop stronger bonds and build confidence in one another. Here are five engaging trust-building games:

Trust Walk

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Blindfolds, obstacle course (optional)

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into pairs. One person in each pair is blindfolded.
  • The sighted partner guides the blindfolded partner on a walk around the area, which can include navigating an obstacle course or simply walking through the office or outdoor space.
  • The guide provides verbal instructions to help the blindfolded partner navigate safely.
  • Switch roles so both partners experience being the guide and the guided.
  • Reflect on the experience and discuss the importance of trust and clear communication.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances trust and cooperation.
  • Encourages clear and precise communication.
  • Promotes empathy and understanding.

Example:

  • The guide might say, “Take three steps forward, turn right, and walk slowly until you feel the edge of the carpet.”

Blindfolded Trust

Team Size: 8–20 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Blindfolds, various objects to create a simple obstacle course

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups of 3–5 people.
  • Blindfold one person from each group, and the rest of the group members must guide them through a simple obstacle course using only verbal instructions.
  • The obstacle course can include objects to step over, under, or around.
  • Once the blindfolded person completes the course, switch roles so everyone has a turn being blindfolded.
  • Discuss the experience and the importance of trust and clear communication.

Why It’s Great:

  • Builds trust and teamwork.
  • Enhances verbal communication and listening skills.
  • Encourages team members to rely on each other.

Example:

  • The guides might direct the blindfolded person to step over a rope, crawl under a table, and navigate around chairs.

Helium Stick

Team Size: 8–12 people
Time: 10–15 minutes
Materials Needed: Lightweight stick or rod

How to Play:

  • Have the team stand in two lines facing each other, with their index fingers extended.
  • Lay a lightweight stick (e.g., a tent pole or bamboo stick) across the group’s fingers.
  • The goal is to lower the stick to the ground without anyone losing contact with it.
  • If someone’s finger loses contact, the group must start over.
  • The task seems simple but requires coordination and communication.

Why It’s Great:

  • Promotes teamwork and coordination.
  • Enhances communication and problem-solving skills.
  • Builds patience and cooperation.

Example:

  • Team members must communicate and move slowly and steadily to lower the stick together, ensuring everyone’s finger remains in contact.

Willow in the Wind

Team Size: 6–12 people
Time: 15–20 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Have the team form a circle with one person standing in the center.
  • The person in the center closes their eyes, crosses their arms over their chest, and remains stiff like a board.
  • The team members in the circle gently push the person in the center back and forth, supporting them and passing them around the circle.
  • Rotate roles so everyone has a turn in the center.
  • Discuss the experience and the importance of trust and support within the team.

Why It’s Great:

  • Builds trust and confidence.
  • Encourages empathy and understanding.
  • Enhances cooperation and teamwork.

Example:

  • The person in the center must trust that their team members will catch and support them as they are gently passed around the circle.

Human Spring

Team Size: 6–12 people
Time: 10–15 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into pairs. Partners stand facing each other, about an arm’s length apart.
  • Each person holds their hands out, palms facing their partner.
  • On the count of three, both partners lean forward simultaneously, pressing their palms together to create resistance and prevent each other from falling.
  • The goal is to balance and support each other, maintaining the “spring” tension between their hands.
  • Rotate partners so everyone has a chance to work with different team members.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances trust and cooperation.
  • Promotes balance and coordination.
  • Encourages teamwork and mutual support.

Example:

  • Partners must communicate and adjust their pressure to maintain balance and prevent either person from falling.

Mine Field

Team Size: 6–20 people
Time: 20–30 minutes
Materials Needed: Various objects to create a “minefield” (e.g., cones, balls, chairs), blindfolds

How to Play:

  • Set up a “minefield” in an open area using various objects.
  • Divide the team into pairs. One person in each pair is blindfolded.
  • The sighted partner guides the blindfolded partner through the minefield using only verbal instructions.
  • The goal is to navigate the minefield without touching any obstacles.
  • Switch roles so both partners experience being the guide and the guided.
  • Reflect on the experience and discuss the importance of trust and clear communication.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances trust and cooperation.
  • Encourages clear and precise communication.
  • Promotes empathy and understanding.

Example:

  • The guide might say, “Take three steps to your left, then step forward carefully.”

Blindfold Tent Build

Team Size: 8–20 people
Time: 30–45 minutes
Materials Needed: Tent and blindfolds

How to Play:

  • Divide the team into small groups of 4–6 people.
  • Blindfold one person in each group, while the rest of the group can see.
  • The goal is to set up a tent with the blindfolded person being the primary builder, guided by the verbal instructions of their sighted teammates.
  • Rotate roles so everyone has a chance to be blindfolded.
  • Discuss the experience and the importance of trust and teamwork.

Why It’s Great:

  • Builds trust and cooperation.
  • Enhances communication and problem-solving skills.
  • Encourages teamwork and patience.

Example:

  • The sighted team members might say, “Unroll the tent completely, find the poles, and insert them into the sleeves.”

Trust Circle

Team Size: 8–20 people
Time: 15–20 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Have the team form a circle, standing shoulder to shoulder.
  • One person stands in the middle of the circle with their eyes closed.
  • The person in the middle crosses their arms over their chest and keeps their body stiff.
  • The team members in the circle gently push the person in the middle back and forth, passing them around the circle.
  • Rotate roles so everyone has a turn in the middle.
  • Discuss the experience and the importance of trust and support within the team.

Why It’s Great:

  • Builds trust and confidence.
  • Encourages empathy and understanding.
  • Enhances cooperation and teamwork.

Example:

  • The person in the middle must trust that their team members will catch and support them as they are gently passed around the circle.

Group Sit

Team Size: 10–20 people
Time: 10–15 minutes
Materials Needed: None

How to Play:

  • Have the team stand in a circle, shoulder to shoulder.
  • Ask everyone to turn to their right so they are facing the back of the person in front of them.
  • On the count of three, everyone slowly sits down on the lap of the person behind them, creating a human chair circle.
  • The goal is to maintain the circle without anyone falling.
  • Discuss the experience and the importance of trust and support within the team.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances trust and cooperation.
  • Promotes teamwork and mutual support.
  • Provides a fun and challenging activity.

Example:

  • Team members must communicate and coordinate their movements to ensure everyone sits down simultaneously without breaking the circle.

Blindfolded Taste Test

Team Size: 6–12 people
Time: 15–20 minutes
Materials Needed: Blindfolds, various food items

How to Play:

  • Blindfold one person from the group and present them with a variety of food items to taste.
  • The blindfolded person must guess what each food item is based solely on taste.
  • Team members can provide verbal clues or descriptions to help the blindfolded person guess.
  • Rotate roles so everyone has a chance to be blindfolded.
  • Discuss the experience and the importance of trust and sensory perception.

Why It’s Great:

  • Enhances trust and sensory awareness.
  • Encourages teamwork and communication.
  • Provides a fun and engaging activity.

Example:

  • The blindfolded person might taste a piece of apple, cheese, or chocolate and guess what it is based on taste and the clues provided by the team.

Disclaimer: The content provided on this webpage is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice. While we strive to ensure the accuracy and timeliness of the information presented here, the details may change over time or vary in different jurisdictions. Therefore, we do not guarantee the completeness, reliability, or absolute accuracy of this information. The information on this page should not be used as a basis for making legal, financial, or any other key decisions. We strongly advise consulting with a qualified professional or expert in the relevant field for specific advice, guidance, or services. By using this webpage, you acknowledge that the information is offered “as is” and that we are not liable for any errors, omissions, or inaccuracies in the content, nor for any actions taken based on the information provided. We shall not be held liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages arising out of your access to, use of, or reliance on any content on this page.

Share the Post:

About The Author

Roger Wood

Roger Wood

With a Baccalaureate of Science and advanced studies in business, Roger has successfully managed businesses across five continents. His extensive global experience and strategic insights contribute significantly to the success of TimeTrex. His expertise and dedication ensure we deliver top-notch solutions to our clients around the world.

Time To Clock-In

Start your 30-day free trial!

Experience the Ultimate Workforce Solution and Revolutionize Your Business Today

TimeTrex Mobile App Hand

Saving businesses time and money through better workforce management since 2003.

Copyright © 2023 TimeTrex. All Rights Reserved.